picturesofwar:

This day in history:

After more than forty years of separation, East Germany is incorporated into the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany), thus marking German reunification.

The day is now known as German Unity Day.

October 3, 1990 - 22 years ago today.

Shared October 03 with 932 notes via picturesofwar-deactivated201307 (Source) - reblog
greatestgeneration:

Airborne troops preparing for the jump into Normandy, June 5, 1944. 

greatestgeneration:

Airborne troops preparing for the jump into Normandy, June 5, 1944. 

Shared June 06 with 214 notes via greatestgeneration (Source) - reblog
greatestgeneration:

Paratroopers in the early hours of June 6, 1944, flying somewhere over the English Channel.

greatestgeneration:

Paratroopers in the early hours of June 6, 1944, flying somewhere over the English Channel.

Shared June 06 with 93 notes via greatestgeneration (Source) - reblog

redlark:

“les goddams - During the Hundred Years’ War, the French took to calling the English les goddams because of their frequent use of expletives.”

I want everyone to know this

Shared April 10 with 125 notes via uro-boros (Source) - reblog

unhistorical:

Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Hirohito as children.

Shared March 31 with 562 notes via islesandforests (Source) - reblog
Shared March 30 with 49,539 notes via thesharminator (Source) - reblog
fyeahhistorymajorheraldicbeast:

When two history students go to the bar, these are the conversations we have.
submitted by sweetonpaper

fyeahhistorymajorheraldicbeast:

When two history students go to the bar, these are the conversations we have.

submitted by sweetonpaper

Shared March 27 with 239 notes via claro3 (Source) - reblog

rhyfeddu-partyofone:

Gas masks and everyday life. WW2, presumably in Great Britain.

Shared March 21 with 565 notes via lostsplendor (Source) - reblog

caesarindacoloseum:

i see you stabbin my chest when i thought we were friends 

and im like

et tu

Shared March 19 with 12,954 notes via wecansexy (Source) - reblog
# oh # history!

bowtiesandbiscuits:

15th of March 2012.

Ordered a Caesar Salad today, proceeded to stab it 23 times before consumption. Nobody else found it as hilarious. 

Shared March 15 with 207,473 notes via ghivashel (Source) - reblog
wizzard890:


Napoleon Crossing the Alps (c. 1801), Jacques-Louis David

Little known fact: the first draft of this painting was doodled dreamily on the back of David’s Trapper Keeper.

wizzard890:

Napoleon Crossing the Alps (c. 1801), Jacques-Louis David

Little known fact: the first draft of this painting was doodled dreamily on the back of David’s Trapper Keeper.

Shared March 14 with 6,223 notes via wizzard890 (Source) - reblog
dailyreenactor:

Philadelphia Campaign of 1777 Sept 25 2010 255 by Darryl W. Moran Photography on Flickr.
Shared February 27 with 34 notes via dredsina (Source) - reblog
lostsplendor:

Hazel Lee [1912-1944] 
Experienced women pilots, like Lee, were eager to join the WASP, and responded to interview requests by Cochran. Members of the WASP reported to Avenger Field, in wind swept Sweetwater, Texas for an arduous 6-month training program. Lee was accepted into the 4th class, 43 W 4.[2] Hazel Ying Lee was the first Chinese American woman to fly for the United States military.
Although flying under military command, the women pilots of the WASP were classified as civilians. They were paid through the civil service. No military benefits were offered. Even if killed in the line of duty, no military funerals were allowed. The WASPs were often assigned the least desirable missions, such as winter trips in open cockpit airplanes. Commanding officers were reluctant to give women any flying deliveries. It took an order from the head of the Air Transport Command to improve the situation.
Upon graduation, Lee was assigned to the third Ferrying Group at Romulus, Michigan. Their assignment was critical to the war effort; Deliver aircraft, pouring out of converted automobile factories, to points of embarkation, where they would then be shipped to the European and Pacific War fronts. In a letter to her sister, Lee described Romulus as “a 7-day workweek, with little time off.” When asked to describe Lee’s attitude, a fellow member of the WASP summed it up in Lee’s own words, “I’ll take and deliver anything.”
Described by her fellow pilots as “calm and fearless,” Lee had two forced landings. One landing took place in a Kansas wheat field. A farmer, pitchfork in hand, chased her around the plane while shouting to his neighbors that the Japanese had invaded Kansas. Alternately running and ducking under her wing, Lee finally stood her ground. She told the farmer who she was and demanded that he put the pitchfork down. He complied.
Lee was a favorite with just about all of her fellow pilots. She had a great sense of humor and a marvelous sense of mischief. Lee used her lipstick to inscribe Chinese characters on the tail of her plane and the planes of her fellow pilots. One lucky fellow who happened to be a bit on the chubby side, had his plane dubbed (unknown to him) “Fat Ass.”
Lee was in demand when a mission was RON (Remaining Overnight) In a big city or in a small country town, she could always find a Chinese restaurant, supervise the menu, and often cook the food herself. She was a great cook. Fellow WASP pilot Sylvia Dahmes Clayton observed that “Hazel provided me with an opportunity to learn about a different culture at a time when I did not know anything else. She expanded my world and my outlook on life.”
Lee and the others were the first women to pilot fighter aircraft for the United States military.
Image (via World War II Database)
Text [click for full article] (via Wikipedia)

lostsplendor:

Hazel Lee [1912-1944] 

Experienced women pilots, like Lee, were eager to join the WASP, and responded to interview requests by Cochran. Members of the WASP reported to Avenger Field, in wind swept Sweetwater, Texas for an arduous 6-month training program. Lee was accepted into the 4th class, 43 W 4.[2] Hazel Ying Lee was the first Chinese American woman to fly for the United States military.

Although flying under military command, the women pilots of the WASP were classified as civilians. They were paid through the civil service. No military benefits were offered. Even if killed in the line of duty, no military funerals were allowed. The WASPs were often assigned the least desirable missions, such as winter trips in open cockpit airplanes. Commanding officers were reluctant to give women any flying deliveries. It took an order from the head of the Air Transport Command to improve the situation.

Upon graduation, Lee was assigned to the third Ferrying Group at Romulus, Michigan. Their assignment was critical to the war effort; Deliver aircraft, pouring out of converted automobile factories, to points of embarkation, where they would then be shipped to the European and Pacific War fronts. In a letter to her sister, Lee described Romulus as “a 7-day workweek, with little time off.” When asked to describe Lee’s attitude, a fellow member of the WASP summed it up in Lee’s own words, “I’ll take and deliver anything.”

Described by her fellow pilots as “calm and fearless,” Lee had two forced landings. One landing took place in a Kansas wheat field. A farmer, pitchfork in hand, chased her around the plane while shouting to his neighbors that the Japanese had invaded Kansas. Alternately running and ducking under her wing, Lee finally stood her ground. She told the farmer who she was and demanded that he put the pitchfork down. He complied.

Lee was a favorite with just about all of her fellow pilots. She had a great sense of humor and a marvelous sense of mischief. Lee used her lipstick to inscribe Chinese characters on the tail of her plane and the planes of her fellow pilots. One lucky fellow who happened to be a bit on the chubby side, had his plane dubbed (unknown to him) “Fat Ass.”

Lee was in demand when a mission was RON (Remaining Overnight) In a big city or in a small country town, she could always find a Chinese restaurant, supervise the menu, and often cook the food herself. She was a great cook. Fellow WASP pilot Sylvia Dahmes Clayton observed that “Hazel provided me with an opportunity to learn about a different culture at a time when I did not know anything else. She expanded my world and my outlook on life.”

Lee and the others were the first women to pilot fighter aircraft for the United States military.

Image (via World War II Database)

Text [click for full article] (via Wikipedia)

Shared February 23 with 5,584 notes via fuckyeahhistorycrushes (Source) - reblog
gatheringbones:

wrathofprawn:

lostsplendor:

stalins-princess:

Nightwitches

Die NachtHexen

Ночные ведьмы

for those not in the know, night witches were russian lady bombers who bombed the shit out of german lines in WW2. Thing is though, they had the oldest, noisiest, crappest planes in the entire world. The engines used to conk out halfway through their missions, so they had to climb out on the wings mid flight to restart the props. to stop germans from hearing them coming and starting up their anti aircraft guns, they’d climb up to a certain height, coast down to german positions, drop their bombs, restart their engines in midair, and get the fuck out of dodge.
their leader flew over 200 missions and was never captured.

gatheringbones:

wrathofprawn:

lostsplendor:

stalins-princess:

Nightwitches

Die NachtHexen

Ночные ведьмы

for those not in the know, night witches were russian lady bombers who bombed the shit out of german lines in WW2. Thing is though, they had the oldest, noisiest, crappest planes in the entire world. The engines used to conk out halfway through their missions, so they had to climb out on the wings mid flight to restart the props. to stop germans from hearing them coming and starting up their anti aircraft guns, they’d climb up to a certain height, coast down to german positions, drop their bombs, restart their engines in midair, and get the fuck out of dodge.

their leader flew over 200 missions and was never captured.

Shared February 11 with 375,482 notes via gatheringbones (Source) - reblog

Ordinary people. The courage to say no. 
The photo was taken in Hamburg in 1936, during the celebrations for the launch of a ship. In the crowd, one person refuses to raise his arm to give the Nazi salute. The man was August Landmesser. He had already been in trouble with the authorities, having been sentenced to two years hard labor for marrying a Jewish woman.
We know little else about August Landmesser, except that he had two children. By pure chance, one of his children recognized her father in this photo when it was published in a German newspaper in 1991. How proud she must have been in that moment.

Ordinary people. The courage to say no.

The photo was taken in Hamburg in 1936, during the celebrations for the launch of a ship. In the crowd, one person refuses to raise his arm to give the Nazi salute. The man was August Landmesser. He had already been in trouble with the authorities, having been sentenced to two years hard labor for marrying a Jewish woman.

We know little else about August Landmesser, except that he had two children. By pure chance, one of his children recognized her father in this photo when it was published in a German newspaper in 1991. How proud she must have been in that moment.

Shared February 09 with 37,884 notes via whirligigfrenzy (Source) - reblog